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Book Review: The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion by Fannie Flagg

Ethereal Jinxed | Book Review | The All-Girl Filling Station's Last Reunion by Fannie Flagg

This book is a tribute to WASPs (Women’s Airforce Service Pilots) of World War II, a historical fiction of the times when women in US contributed to WWII for aviation dependencies for men were busy in combat and how they were not given their due then. However, let me tell you the book is not so serious that it will feel like a bombardment of facts thrown together in a storyline.

The story is a funny and sassy take of different personalities and characters with the back and forth of timeline aptly handled. The characters are not perfect, but faulty and hence realistic and that is why I loved them more since to err is human. The book has those moments when women were thought not to be able to handle gas stations or flights or combats, all these being a male dominated place primarily. What other thing I liked was that it is never too late to reinvent yourself – Sookie (the protagonist) is 60 years old.

The book has its quotable moments and the best one I liked and will remember is:

“I’m telling you, Dena, when you live long enough to see your children begin to look at you with different eyes, and you can look at them not as your children, but as people, it’s worth getting older with all the creaks and wrinkles.”

Being a new mom, somehow I find that everything I do/ read/ think, I relate it to motherhood and baby moments and you will know I am so happy that these days, almost all my book reviews have at least such a mention. Only if the book pages could have been cut a bit by say 50 pages, I would have given it 10-on-10 for at times, the thinking of Sookie got too repetitive, but hey, then these are my views only.

So, go go go, go pick this book (feminists can too) and let me know your opinion in the comments below.

Keep watching my blog for more book reviews!

Book blurb:

Mrs. Sookie Poole of Point Clear, Alabama, has just married off the last of her daughters and is looking forward to relaxing and perhaps traveling with her husband, Earle. The only thing left to contend with is her mother, the formidable Lenore Simmons Krackenberry. Lenore may be a lot of fun for other people, but is, for the most part, an overbearing presence for her daughter. Then one day, quite by accident, Sookie discovers a secret about her mother’s past that knocks her for a loop and suddenly calls into question everything she ever thought she knew about herself, her family, and her future.

Sookie begins a search for answers that takes her to California, the Midwest, and back in time, to the 1940s, when an irrepressible woman named Fritzi takes on the job of running her family’s filling station. Soon truck drivers are changing their routes to fill up at the All-Girl Filling Station. Then, Fritzi sees an opportunity for an even more groundbreaking adventure. As Sookie learns about the adventures of the girls at the All-Girl Filling Station, she finds herself with new inspiration for her own life.

Fabulous, fun-filled, spanning decades and generations, and centered on a little-known aspect of America’s twentieth-century story, The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion is another irresistible novel by the remarkable Fannie Flagg.

About the author:
Fannie Flagg’s career started in the fifth grade when she wrote, directed, and starred in her first play, titled The Whoopee Girls, and she has not stopped since. At age nineteen, she began writing and producing television specials, and later wrote for and appeared on Candid Camera. She then went on to distinguish herself as an actress and a writer in television, films, and the theater. She is the bestselling author of Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man; Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe; Welcome to the World, Baby Girl!; Standing in the Rainbow; A Redbird Christmas; Can’t Wait to Get to Heaven; I Still Dream About You; The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion; and The Whole Town’s Talking. Flagg’s script for the movie Fried Green Tomatoes was nominated for an Academy Award and the Writers Guild of America Award and won the highly regarded Scripter Award for best screenplay of the year. Fannie Flagg is the winner of the Harper Lee Prize. She lives happily in California and Alabama.

Website: fannieflaggbooks.com
Facebook: @fannieflaggbooks

Rating: 9/10
Genre: Historical Fiction, Chick Lit
Book Name: The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion
Author: Fannie Flagg
Pages: 384
Publication Year: 2013
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Book Review: Attachments by Rainbow Rowell

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | Attachments by Rainbow Rowell

So right now, I am heavily invested in chick-lit, the sort of light reads to keep myself happy. But you know searching for light reads which are not too too much romantic and ignoring erotic genre at the same time is not that easy. So since my mood is such, I have curating an easy list for you. You simply need to filter on Chick Lit on my blog 🙂

I came across this writer Rainbow Rowell during my search through good romances of non-classical variety, but found the famous ones being written on teenagers, that is so not what I wanted to read. And then I found out Attachments. How cool is that? Have not we all at some point or the other collaborated in funny banters and gossips on office mails/ chats or forwarding some funny response another one sent us? That is what this book is about, but keeping a person at the helm who reads this chat. Creepy? Yes, although the person reading the mail and the protagonist writing thus fall in love with each other, albeit for different reasons. Sweet! So what you holding on to? Pick up this book for 3 hours read and enjoy!

Keep watching my blog for more book reviews!

Excerpt from the back cover of the book:
“Hi, I’m the guy who reads your e-mail, and also, I love you…”

Beth Fremont and Jennifer Scribner-Snyder know that somebody is monitoring their work e-mail. (Everybody in the newsroom knows. It’s company policy.) But they can’t quite bring themselves to take it seriously. They go on sending each other endless and endlessly hilarious e-mails, discussing every aspect of their personal lives.

Meanwhile, Lincoln O’Neill can’t believe this is his job now- reading other people’s e-mail. When he applied to be “internet security officer,” he pictured himself building firewalls and crushing hackers- not writing up a report every time a sports reporter forwards a dirty joke.

When Lincoln comes across Beth’s and Jennifer’s messages, he knows he should turn them in. But he can’t help being entertained and captivated by their stories.

By the time Lincoln realizes he’s falling for Beth, it’s way too late to introduce himself.

What would he say . . . ?

About the author:
Rainbow Rowell writes books. Sometimes she writes about adults (Attachments and Landline). Sometimes she writes about teenagers (Eleanor & Park and Fangirl). But she always writes about people who talk a lot. And people who feel like they’re screwing up. And people who fall in love.

When she’s not writing, Rainbow is reading comic books, planning Disney World trips and arguing about things that don’t really matter in the big scheme of things.

Twitter: @rainbowrowell
Website: rainbowrowell.com

Rating: 8/10
Genre: Chick Lit
Book Name: Attachments
Author: Rainbow Rowell
Pages: 323
Publication Year: 2011

Book Review: Olivia Joules and the Overactive Imagination by Helen Fielding

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | Olivia Joules and the Overactive Imagination by Helen Fielding

Olivia Joules and the Overactive Imagination by Helen Fielding was just the right book I needed for my hyperactive imagination to unroll in a book. That imagination which you can see on a movie screen with you and the other people you know acting out in a real-life situation, all of your-own-making. Just kidding! I know not everyone is like that, and even if one is, they do not act such all the time.

I had previously seen Bridget Jones’s Diary – one of my few first movie during teenage years and I found the lead actress fat and too sulky. Of course, I do not remember the exact feeling, but it was trepidation that I picked up this book and found it quite interesting, interesting enough to take a break from the second part of The Kingkiller Chronicles. However, the character Olivia Joules, I found to be too much – too much to be real (am I so? *wink *wink). Do pick up this book to break boredom and if you are looking for a light chick-lit, but do not expect much. See, I did not give any spoilers away, even when it was too tough while writing review of this book.

Keep watching my blog for more book reviews!

Excerpt from the back cover of the book:
At the close of the last millennium, Helen Fielding debuted the irrepressible (and blockbuster-bestselling) Bridget Jones. Now, Fielding gives us a sensational new heroine for a new era…Move over 007, a stunning, sexy-and decidedly female-new player has entered the world of international espionage. Her name is Olivia Joules (that’s “J.O.U.L.E.S. the unit of kinetic energy”) and she’s ready to take America by storm with charm, style, and her infamous Overactive Imagination.

How could a girl not be drawn to the alluring, powerful Pierre Ferramo-he of the hooded eyes, impeccable taste, unimaginable wealth, exotic international homes, and dubious French accent? Could Ferramo really be a major terrorist bent on the Western world’s destruction, hiding behind a smokescreen of fine wines, yachts, and actresses slash models? Or is it all just a product of Olivia Joules’s overactive imagination?

Join Olivia in her heart-stopping, hilarious, nerve-frazzling quest from hip hotel to eco-lodge to underwater cave, by light aircraft, speedboat, helicopter, and horse, in this witty, contemporary, and utterly unputdownable novel deluxe.

About the author:
Helen Fielding was born in Yorkshire. She worked for many years in London as a newspaper and TV journalist, travelling as wildly and as often as possibly to Africa, India and Central America. She is the author of four novels: Cause Celeb, Bridget Jones’ s Diary, Bridget Jones:The Edge of Reason and Olivia Joules and the Overactive Imagination, and co-wrote the screenplays for the movie of Bridget Jones’s Diary and the sequel based on The Edge of Reason. She now works full-time as a novelist and screenwriter and lives in London and Los Angeles..
Facebook: @BridgetJonesBook

Rating: 7/10
Genre: Chick Lit
Book Name: Olivia Joules and the Overactive Imagination
Author: Helen Fielding
Pages: 305
Publication Year: 2003

Book Review: Twenty-Eight and a Half Wishes by Denise Grover Swank

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | Twenty-eight and a half wishes by Denise Grover Swank

Genre: Chick-lit
Book Name: Twenty-Eight and a Half Wishes
Rose Gardner Mystery #1
Author: Denise Grover Swank
Pages: 374
Publication Year: 2011
Publisher: Bramagioia Enterprises

Keep on doing random search for free books available on Amazon Kindle and you will end up saving so many books on your own device that in only a few days, you will stop keeping a track of what you are reading. Like me, on most days, rather nights, I start a new book just to leave it incomplete mid-way. In fact, the book Twenty-Eight and a Half Wishes started in a similar way.

Barring grammar mistakes and editing misses here and there (only in a few places), the book seemed ok, a light-read to forget work woes. A chick-lit with a mystery and murder thrown in, the book was something not out of the ordinary or exemplary, but just what I needed this week for a break. As the name of the book suggests, the protagonist prepares a list of 28 things she wants to do in the coming few days, and in your mind, one too starts preparing a similar list. For me, the list goes on like – do bungee jumping, go para-sailing, go on a trip with friends only for reading solely, and other stupid stuff which cannot be disclosed publicly. Just kidding! Have fun reading this one but do not expect much.

P.S: Since it is available free of cost on Amazon Kindle version, shop and enjoy…

Excerpt from the back cover of the book:
For Rose Gardner, working at the DMV on a Friday afternoon is bad even before she sees a vision of herself dead. She’s had plenty of visions, usually boring ones like someone’s toilet’s overflowed, but she’s never seen one of herself before. When her overbearing momma winds up murdered on her sofa instead, two things are certain: There isn’t enough hydrogen peroxide in the state of Arkansas to get that stain out, and Rose is the prime suspect.

Rose realizes she’s wasted twenty-four years of living and makes a list on the back of a Wal-Mart receipt: twenty-eight things she wants to accomplish before her vision comes true. She’s well on her way with the help of her next door neighbor Joe, who has no trouble teaching Rose the rules of drinking, but won’t help with number fifteen – do more with a man. Joe’s new to town, but it doesn’t take a vision for Rose to realize he’s got plenty of secrets of his own.

Somebody thinks Rose has something they want and they’ll do anything to get it. Her house is broken into, someone else she knows is murdered, and suddenly, dying a virgin in the Fenton County jail isn’t her biggest worry after all.

About the author:
New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today bestselling author Denise Grover Swank has released over thirty novels and novellas and has sold over two million books. She writes mysteries with romance, humorous romance, light-hearted young adult romance, and urban fantasy. She lives in Blue Springs, Missouri with her three naughty dogs and six imaginative children.

Website: www.denisegroverswank.com
Facebook: facebook.com/DeniseGroverSwank
Twitter: @denisemswank
Email: denisegroverswank@gmail.com

Rating: 7/10

Book Review: Shopaholic on Honeymoon by Sophie Kinsella

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | Shopaholic on Honeymoon by Sophie Kinsella

Genre: Romance, Chick Lit, Short Story
Book Name: Shopaholic on Honeymoon
Author: Sophie Kinsella
Pages: 53
Publication Year: 2014

I was literally stumped on completing this book Shopaholic on Honeymoon, and not in a good way!

I have read a lot of Sophie’s books but this just seemed too bad – an underdeveloped story, a crazy female protagonist and too few pages, just 53! It was just like seeing a badly made trailer. The antics of the wife on her honeymoon was so irritating, to say the least while forcing her choices on her husband all the time. This is definitely not what I had signed up for when I chose doing lighter reads this month. A great disappointment!

Please stay away from this book, especially if you had not read any of Sophie’s books previously, since this is available free of cost on Sophie’s website as well as on Amazon Kindle version.

Excerpt from the back cover of the book:
As readers of the Shopaholic series will know, I have never described Becky and Luke’s honeymoon, which happens after they get married in Shopaholic Ties the Knot. So as a free update for Shopaholic fans, I have decided to share with you one of the adventures of the newly-wed Becky and Luke. I hope you enjoy it! Love Sophie x

The new Mr and Mrs Brandon are on honeymoon, and Becky has big plans! They’ve got a whole year to explore Venice, learn yoga in India, sleep in little wooden huts in South America… maybe even see penguins in the Arctic. And of course they’ll need to buy just a few essential souvenirs along the way (everyone needs a set of Murano glass goblets, after all).

They’re not just tourists, they’re travellers. Becky is sure it is just the thing that Luke needs – time to unwind. He’ll come back a changed man… with all the good bits still intact of course.

But it soon becomes clear that Luke has different plans entirely. Can Becky help him let go, or will this little disagreement threaten their whole honeymoon?

About the author:
Madeleine Wickham is a bestselling British author under her pseudonym, Sophie Kinsella. Educated at New College, Oxford, she worked as a financial journalist before turning to fiction. She is best known for writing a popular series of chick-lit novels. The Shopaholic novels series focuses on the misadventures of Becky Bloomwood, a financial journalist who cannot manage her own finances. Throughout the entire series, her obsession with shopping and the complications that imparts on her life are central themes.

Twitter: @KinsellaSophie
Facebook: @SophieKinsellaOfficial
Website: sophiekinsella.co.uk

Rating: 2/10

Read reviews of Sophie Kinsella’s other books on this blog – Can You Keep a SecretMy not so Perfect LifeCocktails for Three, Finding Audrey and The Undomestic Goddess.

Book Review: Can You Keep a Secret by Sophie Kinsella

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | Can You Keep a Secret by Sophie Kinsella

Genre: Romance, Chick Lit
Book Name: Can You Keep a Secret
Author: Sophie Kinsella
Pages: 372
Publication Year: 2003
Publisher: Dial Press Trade Paperback

I think I have already got an overdose of Sophie Kinsella’s books after having completed four of them in a month’s time. This is going to be a negative book review in particular since the author has a penchant for writing books under similar genre. I had loved reading Mills and Boons back to back during college days, but oh those were the days. And I am here blabbering and not giving this book it’s due – a book review rather than my life story on this blog post.

Can you keep a Secret is all that I hate in a rom-com where the boss is in love with a reportee who is none too brilliant or exceptional and who is even callous and careless so many times. So what if the female spilled all her secrets to her boss, who is then unknown to her! Although yes, I do agree that one shouldn’t share secrets with everyone around especially when you don’t know what you are getting into, for example the other person can be a real liar, cheater, blackmailer, and what not!

Read the book just for the silly lovey-dovey tidbits, if you think you have not yet grown out of those silly nuances till now.

Excerpt from the back cover of the book:
Nervous flyer Emma is sitting on a turbulent plane. She really thinks that this could be her last moment. So, naturally enough, she starts telling the man sitting next to her – quite a dishy American, but she’s too frightened to notice – all her secrets. How she scans the backs of intellectual books and pretends she’s read them. How she’s not sure if she has a G-spot, and whether her boyfriend could find it anyway. How she feels like a fraud at work – everyone uses the word ‘operational’ all the time but she hasn’t a clue what it means. How she once threw a troublesome client file in the bin. If ever there was a bare soul, it’s hers.

She survives the flight, of course, and the next morning the famous founding boss of the whole mega corporation she works for is coming for a look at the UK branch. As he walks around, Emma looks up and realises…

It’s the man from the plane.

What will he do with her secrets? He knows them all – but she doesn’t know a single one of his. Or… does she?

About the author:
Madeleine Wickham is a bestselling British author under her pseudonym, Sophie Kinsella. Educated at New College, Oxford, she worked as a financial journalist before turning to fiction. She is best known for writing a popular series of chick-lit novels. The Shopaholic novels series focuses on the misadventures of Becky Bloomwood, a financial journalist who cannot manage her own finances. Throughout the entire series, her obsession with shopping and the complications that imparts on her life are central themes.

Twitter: @KinsellaSophie
Facebook: @SophieKinsellaOfficial
Website: sophiekinsella.co.uk

Rating: 5/10

Read reviews of Sophie Kinsella’s other books on this blog – My not so Perfect LifeCocktails for Three, Finding Audrey and The Undomestic Goddess.

Book Review: My not so Perfect Life by Sophie Kinsella

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | My not so Perfect Life by Sophie Kinsella

Genre: Romance, Chick Lit
Book Name: My not so Perfect Life
Author: Sophie Kinsella
Pages: 438
Publication Year: 2017
Publisher: Bantam Press

Bright the sun
Fresh the air
Bright should be the mood
Around the year

Sophie Kinsella’s books have always reminded me of the above poem. When I had first read one of her books a few years back – the first of Shopoholic series, I was totally hooked to such simplistic writing. Especially, when simplistic writing is not so easy and many writers have floundered there.

Another of Sophie Kinsella’s book that I picked up today and I was surprised finding that it is not her typical book. I mean, the main protagonist Katie/Cat does have something substantial to do rather than just romancing around. I will tell you what this book reminded me of – The Devil Wears Prada. However, like Sophie’s books, this too had a happy ending unlike the other book which of course was more realistic.

Not recommended, if you are just looking for a light read. But yes, read it to vent anger thinking about your evil boss or any other person that you hate since the book has a few moments where you can picturize that hated character in real shit. Hope I did not give much of a spoiler away that the book blurb hadn’t already mentioned. Enjoy!

Excerpt from the back cover of the book:
Katie Brenner has the perfect life: a flat in London, a glamorous job, and a super-cool Instagram feed.

Ok, so the real truth is that she rents a tiny room with no space for a wardrobe, has a hideous commute to a lowly admin job, and the life she shares on Instagram isn’t really hers.

But one day her dreams are bound to come true, aren’t they?

Until her not-so perfect life comes crashing down when her mega-successful boss Demeter gives her the sack. All Katie’s hopes are shattered. She has to move home to Somerset, where she helps her dad with his new glamping business.

Then Demeter and her family book in for a holiday, and Katie sees her chance. But should she get revenge on the woman who ruined her dreams? Or try to get her job back? Does Demeter – the woman with everything – have such an idyllic life herself? Maybe they have more in common than it seems.

And what’s wrong with not-so-perfect, anyway?

About the author:
Madeleine Wickham is a bestselling British author under her pseudonym, Sophie Kinsella. Educated at New College, Oxford, she worked as a financial journalist before turning to fiction. She is best known for writing a popular series of chick-lit novels. The Shopaholic novels series focuses on the misadventures of Becky Bloomwood, a financial journalist who cannot manage her own finances. Throughout the entire series, her obsession with shopping and the complications that imparts on her life are central themes.

Twitter: @KinsellaSophie
Facebook: @SophieKinsellaOfficial
Website: sophiekinsella.co.uk

Rating: 6/10

Read reviews of Sophie Kinsella’s other books on this blog – Cocktails for Three, Can You Keep a SecretFinding Audrey and The Undomestic Goddess.

Book Review: A Place Called Here by Cecelia Ahern

Genre: Chick Lit
Book Name: A Place Called Here
Author: Cecelia Ahern
Pages: 485
Publication Year: 2003
Publisher: Harper Collins

What happens when you have heard praises about a particular book, especially from one of your literary intellectual friends who usually reads non-fiction but still recommends a fiction to a fiction-lover like me? It definitely raises very high expectations. That is what happened with A Place Called Here, where reading the first  few pages, I was irritated with what the protagonist wanted to achieve by searching where all lost things or people for that matter are. Oh, by the way, my friend gifted this book to me along with two surprisingly beautiful bookmarks. Imagine my grin from ear to ear!

The book in itself is good, and the story is of a magical world. It picks up the tempo (yes, you got it right) after first few pages when Sandy Shortt herself gets lost. One quote that I truly loved in the book is the line said by Sandy to Jack during their conversation about a missing person – “I can only assume that there’s only one thing more frustrating than not being able to find someone, and that’s not being found. I would want someone to find me, more than anything.” In our realistic world, this points remarkably to find oneself and at least one person to help one find themselves. And that things will keep on getting lost and people will suddenly vanish from your life, with their memories slowly fading away, but it’s important to keep your sanity together and be with the ones who love you currently.

The book reminded me of a TV series I had watched once “Once upon a time”. However, probably it being a TV series and not confined to a limited number of pages, linked together why a particular town was cut off from rest of the world and how people from outside world knew nothing about that magical place. Here, in the book, the story had too many loose ends. Hoping that there is going to be a sequel to plug in the gaps.

But for the romantic (not only the love kinds, but who wishes magical world to exist), do give this book a try! I liked the book somehow, so I am probably still a romantic, good or bad, let’s leave it for you to decide!

Book blurb:
Ever wondered where lost things go?

Ever since the day her classmate vanished, Sandy Shortt has been haunted by what happens when something – or someone – disappears. Finding has become her goal.

Jack Ruttle is desperate to find his younger brother who vanished into thin air a year ago. He spots an ad for Sandy’s missing persons agency and is certain that she will answer his prayers and find his brother.

But then Sandy disappears too, stumbling upon a place that is a world away from the only one she has ever known. Now all she wants, more than anything, is to find her way home.

About the author:
Before embarking on her writing career, Cecelia Ahern studied Journalism at university. Her first novel, PS, I Love You, became an instant international bestseller and was adapted into a major movie. Her subsequent novels have also all been bestsellers. When she’s not busy writing novels, Cecelia also writes for TV and the stage. Her books are published in 46 countries and have sold over 13 million copies. She lives in Dublin with her family.

Twitter: @Cecelia_Ahern
Website: cecelia-ahern.com

Rating: 7/10

Book Review: Everyone Worth Knowing by Lauren Weisberger

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger

Genre: Chick Lit, Humor
Book Name: Everyone Worth Knowing
Author: Lauren Weisberger
Pages: 370
Publication Year: 2005
Publisher: Harper Collins

When you get hold of a book which has two novels combined and enjoy reading the first one, what will you do next? It’s the same author, so of course, one knows what to expect next. So simply, we continue reading the second story too. That’s what happened when I started reading a twin book – The Devil Wears Prada and Everyone Worth Knowing.

A chick-lit through and through, the book has plenty of pages just to bury yourself in after a hectic day in office to unwind. The protagonist hates her banking job, resigns at the spur of the moment, takes up another job in a different vertical altogether and does a fabulous job. Oh, how we all aspire to do the same! But mostly, people just do an MBA to switch career line these days.

However, the characters in this book seem more relatable to our world as compared with The Devil Wears Prada – be it the childhood friendship growing apart with focus on their respective lives, career orientation, office politics, difficult relationships, the one-true-love (laughable) and need to be famous (acknowledged). Think of the book as a light read with not too much drama and you may not be disappointed. Haven’t we all indulged in too-much chocolatey flavor once in a while, even though you know it’s not that good for our health? This book is exactly that. Enjoy!

Book blurb:
Bette gets paid to party.

And she can hardly believe her luck. Running with celebs, gaining VIP access to Manhattan’s hottest clubs and meeting ‘everyone worth knowing’ is a million miles away from her old banking job.

When she turns up in the gossip columns with a notorious British playboy, it delights her publicity-mad new boss. But her family and her friends want to know what happened to the girl who loved bad novels, 80’s music and always had time for them.

Can Bette say goodbye to the glamour and the Gucci and step back into the real world? And where will she find her own prince charming?

About the author:
Lauren Weisberger is the New York Times bestselling author of The Devil Wears Prada, which was published in forty languages and made into a major motion picture starring Meryl Streep and Anne Hathaway. It was announced in 2017 that musician Elton John and Paul Rudnick will adapt The Devil Wears Prada for the stage. Weisberger’s four other novels, Everyone Worth Knowing, Chasing Harry Winston, Last Night at Chateau MarmontRevenge Wears Prada and The Single’s Game, were all top-ten New York Times bestsellers. Her books have sold more than thirteen million copies worldwide. A graduate of Cornell University, she lives in Connecticut with her husband and two children.

Twitter: @LWeisberger
Website: laurenweisberger.com

Read reviews of other books written by Laura on my blog – The Devil Wears Prada.

Rating: 9/10

Book Review: The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger

Genre: Chick Lit, Humor
Book Name: The Devil Wears Prada
Author: Lauren Weisberger
Pages: 360
Publication Year: 2003
Publisher: Harper Collins

Once in a while, you can get tired of reading intellectual books. And voila, you find a book in the corner of your book shelf, totally untouched. And noticing the book title, you simply wish to wallow in a chick lit, just for the pleasure of it. And that, my dear reader, is how I started reading The Devil Wears Prada.

Although I have seen the movie adaptation years back, I somehow still remember the oh-so-typical characters Andrea Sachs and Miranda Priestly and the way Miranda used to call An-dre-aaa. Funny though while reading the book, I could hear the same tone whenever Andrea was called. Yet there were lingering moments where I felt the movie adaptation was better than the book itself.

Let’s come back to the book. It’s a women “fiction” (supposedly) since the author Lauren had worked for the highly esteemed fashion editor Anna Wintour and various articles seem to draw a parallel between both of them and the storyline. The book is like a diary entry set in the fashion world. The same old princess story which we have grown up reading, but now cast in a career world. So, we have a beautiful princess working for Cruella who hates every minute of it. But since she is so career focused, she continues to be in that hated job, since this will fast forward her career by few years. And thus, she does not seem pitiful anymore since it was her choice to focus on her career and never on the family. Also, Andrea seems to be a workaholic but does not forge interest in anything she does.

However, having said that, I really loved reading the book. The book has casual tidbits, easy dialogues, many aspirational fashion pieces one would want to own at whatever cost, and the adrenaline rush when Andrea is scared of the high demands of her boss (which by the way, happens all through the book). Oh, doesn’t this seem a part of our own corporate life! The book made me live the fashion industry vicariously and high demands of so much glitz all the time. Also, the book has a lesson in the end that one always has a choice to change anything in one’s life!

Book blurb:
High fashion, low cunning – and the boss from hell.

When Andrea first sets foot in the plush Manhattan offices of Runway she knows nothing. She’s never heard of the world’s most fashionable magazine, or it’s feared and fawned-over editor, Miranda Priestly.

Soon she knows way too much.

She knows it’s a sacking offense to wear less than a three-inch heel to work – but there’s always a fresh pair of Manolos in the accessories cupboard.

She knows that eight stone is fat. That you can charge anything – cars, manicures, clothese – to the Runway account, but you must never leave your desk, or let Miranda’s coffee get cold. That at 3 am, when your boyfriend’s dumping you because you’re always working and your best friend’s just been arrested, if Miranda phones with her latest unreasonable demand, you jump.

Most of all, Andrea knows that Miranda is a monster boss who makes Cruella de Vil look like a fluffy bunny. But this is her big break, and it’s all going to be worth in the end.

Isn’t it?

About the author:
Lauren Weisberger is the New York Times bestselling author of The Devil Wears Prada, which was published in forty languages and made into a major motion picture starring Meryl Streep and Anne Hathaway. It was announced in 2017 that musician Elton John and Paul Rudnick will adapt The Devil Wears Prada for the stage. Weisberger’s four other novels, Everyone Worth Knowing, Chasing Harry Winston, Last Night at Chateau MarmontRevenge Wears Prada and The Single’s Game, were all top-ten New York Times bestsellers. Her books have sold more than thirteen million copies worldwide. A graduate of Cornell University, she lives in Connecticut with her husband and two children.

Twitter: @LWeisberger
Website: laurenweisberger.com

Rating: 8/10

Read reviews of other books by Lauren Weisberger on my blog – Everyone Worth Knowing.

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