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Book Review: April Lady by Georgette Heyer

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | April Lady by Georgette Heyer

While reading psycho-thrillers back to back, I thought to give it a break (recommended by one of my reading group members before I turn to the dark side. Buhahahahaha) and so I chose Regency Romance queen Georgette Heyer whose The Grand Sophy and Devil’s Cub I had completed few months back.

April Lady is a typical romantic book but which will make you smile. It is also an easy read, specially for the mind to relax, even after there is so much melodrama. In fact, it acted as the sort of relaxing/ meditating music one usually listens to for sleeping. And when I talk of sleep, yes, this time, I completed it slowly slowly in a fortnight.

However, if I have to recommend between this book and The Grand Sophy, I will pick the latter one only (for it had that X entertaining factor).

Keep watching my blog for more book reviews!

Book blurb:
Despite the scandalous blemish on the family name of his 18 year old bride, Lord Giles Cardross is convinced beautiful Helen cares for him. When newlywed begins to fill her days with fashion and frivolity, her husband has to wonder whether she really did marry him for his money, as his family so helpfully suggests. He thought they were marrying for love, but as the bills and extravagant debts begin to mount up, Giles begins to suspect that perhaps his adored wife isn’t as innocent as he supposed. Especially since, as of late, she’s been unable to look him in the eye…

Impetuous Lady Helen Cardross had collected quite a basket of little white lies in her efforts to help those less fortunate than herself. There were, for example; her own dashing, debt-ridden brother, and her husband’s love-sick, youthful sister. But to her adored (and adoring) lord and master, there could be no dissembling of integrity, honor, or truth. One faced up to grim reality — unless one were Lady Helen.

When his family’s priceless jewels disappear, Lord Cardross is aghast at the idea that his lovely new wife might be the culprit, but he soon discovers the truth about Lady Nell’s situation. And between his concern over his wife’s spending sprees, rescuing her impulsive brother from one scrape after another, and attempting to prevent his own half–it’s no wonder the much-tried earl can’t see where he’s gone wrong. And now owing a shocking amount of money, Nell doesn’t dare tell him the truth–that she’s loved him from the first, and thought he’d married her for convenience.

About the author:
Georgette Heyer was a prolific historical romance and detective fiction novelist. Her husband George Ronald Rougier, a mining engineer often provided basic plot outlines for her thrillers. Beginning in 1932, Heyer released one romance novel and one thriller each year.

Heyer was an intensely private person who remained a best selling author all her life without the aid of publicity. She made no appearances, never gave an interview and only answered fan letters herself if they made an interesting historical point. She sometimes wrote under the pseudonym Stella Martin.

Her Regencies were inspired by Jane Austen, but unlike Austen, who wrote about and for the times in which she lived, Heyer was forced to include copious information about the period so that her readers would understand the setting. While some critics thought her novels were too detailed, others considered the level of detail to be Heyer’s greatest asset.

Heyer remains a popular and much-loved author, known for essentially establishing the historical romance genre and its subgenre Regency romance.

Rating: 7/10
Genre: Historical Romance
Book Name: April Lady
Author: Georgette Heyer
Pages: 246
Publication Year: 1957
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Book Review: Five Quarters of the Orange by Joanne Harris

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | Five Quarters of the Orange by Joanne Harris

Had you checked my review of Chocolat and its sequel The Lollipop ShoesIf not, click on the hyperlinks. Each was an amazing fantasy book with chocolate recipes weaved into the tale and I was so impressed with the writings of Joanne Harris, the author, that I had to give another book of hers a read. Now, this line I have just written you may find at contradiction with my review of Me Before You by Jojo Moyes where I did not feel like reading another book of the same author one after the other, but it so happened that I had read Five Quarters of the Orange a month back and forgot altogether about writing a review. I got reminded recently when a friend recommended me to read Joanne Harris books. But you know, a lot can happen in a month, your mind and heart can flip 180°.

So, about the book, it follows the same standard format of recipes (not chocolate this time) weaved in the storyline. However, I felt it was lacking in many fronts, especially the suspense of why the main protagonist has hidden her real name. In fact there were many questions I wanted answer of while reading the story, but of which the book did not conclude, e.g. what was it that led the main protagonist’s mother to fear orange. Probably it may not have resulted in fast forwarding the storyline, but I was assuming that there would be much more in the ending. Even the notes in the book is not leading to major disclosure (again I sort of expected this to happen). My bad, to have high expectations from a book or a person.

However, if you do not compare Chocolat and this book Five Quarters of the Orange, it is an “okay” book on its own. You can read it if are not able to find other better books.

Keep watching my blog for more book reviews!

Book blurb:
The novels of Joanne Harris are a literary feast for the senses. Five Quarters of the Orange represents Harris’s most complex and sophisticated work yet – a novel in which darkness and fierce joy come together to create an unforgettable story.

When Framboise Simon returns to a small village on the banks of the Loire, the locals do not recognize her as the daughter of the infamous Mirabelle Dartigen – the woman they still hold responsible for a terrible tragedy that took place during the German occupation decades before. Although Framboise hopes for a new beginning she quickly discovers that past and present are inextricably intertwined. Nowhere is this truth more apparent than in the scrapbook of recipes she has inherited from her dead mother.

With this book, Framboise re-creates her mother’s dishes, which she serves in her small creperie. And yet as she studies the scrapbook – searching for clues to unlock the contradiction between her mother’s sensuous love of food and often cruel demeanor – she begins to recognize a deeper meaning behind Mirabelle’s cryptic scribbles. Within the journal’s tattered pages lies the key to what actually transpired the summer Framboise was nine years old.

Rich and dark. Five Quarters of the Orange is a novel of mothers and daughters of the past and the present, of resisting, and succumbing, and an extraordinary work by a masterful writer.

About the author:
Joanne Harris is a British author, whose books include fourteen novels, two cookbooks and many short stories. Her work is extremely diverse, covering aspects of magic realism, suspense, historical fiction, mythology and fantasy. She has also written a DR WHO novella for the BBC, has scripted guest episodes for the game ZOMBIES, RUN!, and is currently engaged in a number of musical theatre projects as well as developing an original drama for television.

In 2000, her 1999 novel CHOCOLAT was adapted to the screen, starring Juliette Binoche and Johnny Depp. She is an honorary Fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, and in 2013 was awarded an MBE by the Queen.

Her hobbies are listed in Who’s Who as ‘mooching, lounging, strutting, strumming, priest-baiting and quiet subversion’. She also spends too much time on Twitter; plays flute and bass guitar in a band first formed when she was 16; and works from a shed in her garden at her home in Yorkshire.

Website: joanne-harris.co.uk
Twitter: @Joannechocolat

Rating: 6/10
Genre: Historical Fiction
Book Name: Five Quarters of the Orange
Author: Joanne Harris
Pages: 307
Publication Year: 2001

Book Review: Devil’s Cub by Georgette Heyer

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | Devil's Cub by Georgette Heyer

Is it necessary that we need to read any book series in a particular order, i.e. chronologically? Yes, but if you are not able to find the previoust ones, should you skip on the sequels as well? Of course not. I mean this is what I think. So after completing The Grand Sophy by Georgette Heyer (click on the hyperlink to check my review of this book read a month back), there were many other books recommended to me by the same author, one of which was These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub, but since I couldn’t get hold of the former one, I started off with the latter.

You know I had never heard of Georgette Heyer during my school or college days, I am sure I would have loved these even better then. In fact, the author has been very popular for many in my reading groups have entire collection of her books or have read each one of her books. But better late than never!

The book starts in a typical fashion – the male protagonist being a playboy and I wondered if it is going to end in a typical fashion. However, as I had heard that Georgette’s females have strong character sketches – feisty, witty, intelligent and sensible, I continued and glad I did that. Although there was too much drama in the end, it was an outright entertainer. And in the end, it brought a stupid smile on my face once I completed reading this book.

Please check below a few dialogues from this book:

“You will very soon be. Sit down. Why are you not at the ball?”
“I had no inclination for it, sir. I might ask, why are not you?”
“Not finding you there, I came here,” he replied.
“I am indeed flattered,” said Miss Challoner.
He laughed. “It’s all I went for, my dear, I assure you. Why was that fellow holding your hands?”
“For comfort,” said Miss Challoner desolately.
He held out his own. “Give them to me.” 

“You will like her,” he persisted. “Egad, she’s after your own heart, maman! She shot me in the arm.”

However, if I have to recommend between this book and The Grand Sophy, I will pick the latter one only.

Keep watching my blog for more book reviews!

Book blurb:
Dominic Alistair, Marquis of Vidal is a bad lot – a rake and seducer, reckless, heedless, and possessed of a murderous temper. He is known by friend and foe alike as the “Devil’s Cub”. Yet as the handsome and wealthy heir to a Dukedom, he is considered a good prospect on the marriage market. Vidal currently has his eye on the young, lovely, and unintelligent Sophia Challoner, and Sophia’s greedy mother is more than happy to encourage his dubious attentions.

When lovely, saucy Mary Challoner had practiced her bold deception upon the hot-blooded, fiery-tempered young Marquis of Vidal–substituting herself for her young sister he had thought to carry off to France–she had little notion he would grimly hold her to her part of the bargain. Now he had left her, and she was alone, a stranger in a strange land, prey to the intrigues of glittering, heartless, 18th century Paris.

Only one person could rescue her–the Marquis himself. But how could she ever trust this man? How could she even hope to overcome the contempt in which he held her? And how could even the sudden flowering of her love ever bridge the terrible gap between them?

About the author:
Georgette Heyer was a prolific historical romance and detective fiction novelist. Her husband George Ronald Rougier, a mining engineer often provided basic plot outlines for her thrillers. Beginning in 1932, Heyer released one romance novel and one thriller each year.

Heyer was an intensely private person who remained a best selling author all her life without the aid of publicity. She made no appearances, never gave an interview and only answered fan letters herself if they made an interesting historical point. She sometimes wrote under the pseudonym Stella Martin.

Her Regencies were inspired by Jane Austen, but unlike Austen, who wrote about and for the times in which she lived, Heyer was forced to include copious information about the period so that her readers would understand the setting. While some critics thought her novels were too detailed, others considered the level of detail to be Heyer’s greatest asset.

Heyer remains a popular and much-loved author, known for essentially establishing the historical romance genre and its subgenre Regency romance.

Rating: 8/10
Genre: Historical Romance
Book Name: Devil’s Cub
(Alastair-Audley #2)
Author: Georgette Heyer
Pages: 323
Publication Year: 1932

Book Review: The Grand Sophy by Georgette Heyer

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | The Grand Sophy by Georgette Heyer

I hadn’t read romantic books in months, not even preferring this genre in years post college. Still when I heard (read read) about The Grand Sophy being referred by many in my reading group as one of the books that must be read, I thought to give it a try. Just a disclaimer: I am currently into the mood of light reading and since I pick only fiction, bear with me, my dear blog posts reader, such easy reads for some more time. No no, don’t leave my blog for ever, I will revert to a few serious books soon enough.

This was a book published in older times, still the protagonist, a female took charge of herself and surroundings when it was not supposed to be then, made it more likable for me. Though some characters were stereotyped, the writing of Georgette Heyer made this book a non stoppable one for me. You can imagine my level of liking (read addiction) with this – I read it till late 2 nights consecutively even when my baby had slept off when I have to sparingly utilize my hours of sleep every night. However, please do not think of comparing it with some literary insight books or Mills and Boons (or other such type containing sex scenes) and you have a winner here. I loved the book so much to give it a 10-on-10.

Keep watching my blog for more book reviews!

Book blurb:
Resourceful, adventurous and utterly indefatigable, Sophy is hardly the mild-mannered girl that the Rivenhalls expect when they agree to take her in. Kind-hearted Aunt Lizzy is shocked; stern Cousin Charles and his humorless fiancée Eugenia are disapproving.

With her inimitable mixture of exuberance and grace Sophy soon sets about endearing herself to her family, but finds herself increasingly drawn to her cousin. Can she really be falling in love with him, and he with her? And what of his betrothal to Eugenia?

About the author:
Georgette Heyer was a prolific historical romance and detective fiction novelist. Her husband George Ronald Rougier, a mining engineer often provided basic plot outlines for her thrillers. Beginning in 1932, Heyer released one romance novel and one thriller each year.

Heyer was an intensely private person who remained a best selling author all her life without the aid of publicity. She made no appearances, never gave an interview and only answered fan letters herself if they made an interesting historical point. She sometimes wrote under the pseudonym Stella Martin.

Her Regencies were inspired by Jane Austen, but unlike Austen, who wrote about and for the times in which she lived, Heyer was forced to include copious information about the period so that her readers would understand the setting. While some critics thought her novels were too detailed, others considered the level of detail to be Heyer’s greatest asset.

Heyer remains a popular and much-loved author, known for essentially establishing the historical romance genre and its subgenre Regency romance.

Rating: 10/10
Genre: Historical Romance
Book Name: The Grand Sophy
Author: Georgette Heyer
Pages: 338
Publication Year: 1950

Book Review: The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion by Fannie Flagg

Ethereal Jinxed | Book Review | The All-Girl Filling Station's Last Reunion by Fannie Flagg

This book is a tribute to WASPs (Women’s Airforce Service Pilots) of World War II, a historical fiction of the times when women in US contributed to WWII for aviation dependencies for men were busy in combat and how they were not given their due then. However, let me tell you the book is not so serious that it will feel like a bombardment of facts thrown together in a storyline.

The story is a funny and sassy take of different personalities and characters with the back and forth of timeline aptly handled. The characters are not perfect, but faulty and hence realistic and that is why I loved them more since to err is human. The book has those moments when women were thought not to be able to handle gas stations or flights or combats, all these being a male dominated place primarily. What other thing I liked was that it is never too late to reinvent yourself – Sookie (the protagonist) is 60 years old.

The book has its quotable moments and the best one I liked and will remember is:

“I’m telling you, Dena, when you live long enough to see your children begin to look at you with different eyes, and you can look at them not as your children, but as people, it’s worth getting older with all the creaks and wrinkles.”

Being a new mom, somehow I find that everything I do/ read/ think, I relate it to motherhood and baby moments and you will know I am so happy that these days, almost all my book reviews have at least such a mention. Only if the book pages could have been cut a bit by say 50 pages, I would have given it 10-on-10 for at times, the thinking of Sookie got too repetitive, but hey, then these are my views only.

So, go go go, go pick this book (feminists can too) and let me know your opinion in the comments below.

Keep watching my blog for more book reviews!

Book blurb:

Mrs. Sookie Poole of Point Clear, Alabama, has just married off the last of her daughters and is looking forward to relaxing and perhaps traveling with her husband, Earle. The only thing left to contend with is her mother, the formidable Lenore Simmons Krackenberry. Lenore may be a lot of fun for other people, but is, for the most part, an overbearing presence for her daughter. Then one day, quite by accident, Sookie discovers a secret about her mother’s past that knocks her for a loop and suddenly calls into question everything she ever thought she knew about herself, her family, and her future.

Sookie begins a search for answers that takes her to California, the Midwest, and back in time, to the 1940s, when an irrepressible woman named Fritzi takes on the job of running her family’s filling station. Soon truck drivers are changing their routes to fill up at the All-Girl Filling Station. Then, Fritzi sees an opportunity for an even more groundbreaking adventure. As Sookie learns about the adventures of the girls at the All-Girl Filling Station, she finds herself with new inspiration for her own life.

Fabulous, fun-filled, spanning decades and generations, and centered on a little-known aspect of America’s twentieth-century story, The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion is another irresistible novel by the remarkable Fannie Flagg.

About the author:
Fannie Flagg’s career started in the fifth grade when she wrote, directed, and starred in her first play, titled The Whoopee Girls, and she has not stopped since. At age nineteen, she began writing and producing television specials, and later wrote for and appeared on Candid Camera. She then went on to distinguish herself as an actress and a writer in television, films, and the theater. She is the bestselling author of Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man; Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe; Welcome to the World, Baby Girl!; Standing in the Rainbow; A Redbird Christmas; Can’t Wait to Get to Heaven; I Still Dream About You; The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion; and The Whole Town’s Talking. Flagg’s script for the movie Fried Green Tomatoes was nominated for an Academy Award and the Writers Guild of America Award and won the highly regarded Scripter Award for best screenplay of the year. Fannie Flagg is the winner of the Harper Lee Prize. She lives happily in California and Alabama.

Website: fannieflaggbooks.com
Facebook: @fannieflaggbooks

Rating: 9/10
Genre: Historical Fiction, Chick Lit
Book Name: The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion
Author: Fannie Flagg
Pages: 384
Publication Year: 2013

Book Review: Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez

EtherealJinxed | Book Review | Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez

Before I start writing review of this book Love in the Time of Cholera, here is my own personal story of how I picked it up in the first place. Frankly speaking I no more like typical love stories; I think I am past that age! But then when my cousin suggested a scoopwhoop link – if you want to read a love story but cannot deal with mushy at all, it was like an answer in the right direction and thus, I started off this book.

I would say it was a great experience since I had not read a book slow in pace savoring the background and spaces, and this book really helped me in sleeping after reading 2-3 pages only every day for past 1 month. So, you know which book I am going to recommend next if you find trouble sleeping but still love love stories. Just kidding! It turned out to be a great tear-extractor for me in places when the person you loved desperately simply ignored you!

The book is a slow start, but to a great end, especially the last 25% of the book, where I easily turned the pages since the ages old love was not that unrequited after all! But will that be for forever. Now, let me not give the story-line all away, for you must enjoy the magic realism set forth by the author on your own. Wooaahh, I just realized while writing this post that the author is a Novel Prize winner and I had thought I could not handle one ever 🙂

Keep watching my blog for more book reviews!

 

Excerpt from the back cover of the book:
Nobel prize winner and author of One Hundred Years of Solitude Gabriel Garcia Marquez tells a tale of an unrequited love that outlasts all rivals in his masterpiece Love in the Time of Cholera.

‘It was inevitable: the scent of bitter almonds always reminded him of the fate of unrequited love’

Fifty-one years, nine months and four days have passed since Fermina Daza rebuffed hopeless romantic Florentino Ariza’s impassioned advances and married Dr Juvenal Urbino instead. During that half-century, Florentino has fallen into the arms of many delighted women, but has loved none but Fermina. Having sworn his eternal love to her, he lives for the day when he can court her again.

When Fermina’s husband is killed trying to retrieve his pet parrot from a mango tree, Florentino seizes his chance to declare his enduring love. But can young love find new life in the twilight of their lives?

About the author:
Gabriel José de la Concordia Garcí­a Márquez was a Colombian novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter and journalist. Garcí­a Márquez, familiarly known as “Gabo” in his native country, was considered one of the most significant authors of the 20th century. In 1982, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

He wrote many acclaimed non-fiction works and short stories, but is best-known for his novels, such as One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967) and Love in the Time of Cholera (1985). His works have achieved significant critical acclaim and widespread commercial success, most notably for popularizing a literary style labeled as magical realism, which uses magical elements and events in order to explain real experiences. Some of his works are set in a fictional village called Macondo, and most of them express the theme of solitude.

His novel, El amor en los tiempos del cólera (1985), or Love in the Time of Cholera, drew a large global audience as well. The work was partially based on his parents’ courtship and was adapted into a 2007 film starring Javier Bardem. García Márquez wrote seven novels during his life, with additional titles including El general en su laberinto (1989), or The General in His Labyrinth, and Del amor y otros demonios (1994), or Of Love and Other Demons..

Rating: 8/10
Genre: Historical Fiction
Book Name: Love in the Time of Cholera
Author: Gabriel García Márquez
Pages: 348
Publication Year: 1985

Book Review: Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

EtherealJinxed|Book Review | Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

Genre: Historical Fiction
Book Name: Things Fall Apart
Author: Chinua Achebe
Pages: 224
Publication Year: 1958
Publisher: Anchor
Notable Points: Made into radio program,
movie, mini-series

This fictional book seems to emerge from the reality of the living conditions and interactions of Nigerian tribal communities in the pre-colonial era and the subtle changes the missionaries did without being extra-aggressive. Chinua Achebe has also explained in great detail on why a character behaves thus with others. All emotions – love, heartbreak, frustration, anger, sacrifice, retirement and the human psychiatry have been given their own spaces and scope to intermingle with each other.

A tough book to read from the start, where one may get confused with the names of the characters sounding very similar to each other. Probably, this is how outsiders may feel about Indian names as well. So that’s normal. But once you remember the character a name is referring to, you get deeply involved with the same. All that ends in a story is not supposed to be well and happy; the ending though was perfect in this case with the tint of tragedy.

It’s been years since Things Fall Apart was published but it’s still one of the favorite books of literature with many schools/ colleges recommending the same (not in India).

Excerpt from the back cover of the book:
Things Fall Apart tells two intertwining stories, both centering on Okonkwo, a “strong man” of an Ibo village in Nigeria. The first, a powerful fable of the immemorial conflict between the individual and society, traces Okonkwo’s fall from grace with the tribal world. The second, as modern as the first is ancient, concerns the clash of cultures and the destruction of Okonkwo’s world with the arrival of aggressive European missionaries.

These perfectly harmonized twin dramas are informed by an awareness capable of encompassing at once the life of nature, human history, and the mysterious compulsions of the soul.

About the author:
Chinua Achebe was a novelist, poet, professor at Brown University and critic. He is best known for his first novel, Things Fall Apart (1958), which is the most widely read book in modern African literature.

Achebe’s novels focus on the traditions of Igbo society, the effect of Christian influences, and the clash of values during and after the colonial era. His style relied heavily on the Igbo oral tradition, and combines straightforward narration with representations of folk stories, proverbs, and oratory. He also published a number of short stories, children’s books, and essay collections.

Rating: 8/10

Book Journey: Chanakya’s Chant

EtherealJinxed|Book Review | Chanakya's Chant by Ashwin Sanghi

Genre: Political Thriller, Historical Fiction
Book Name: Chanakya’s Chant
Author: Ashwin Sanghi
Pages: 448
Publication Year: 2010
Publisher: Westland Ltd

Why are the kids made to read history? Why do we adults browse through the same? Because as it is often said – History repeats itself, and we can learn from it and avoid making the same mistakes. And who better to learn from than the brilliant strategist Chanakya. Ever noticed the popular postings on FB on Chanakya Niti/ Chanakya Sutra?

In that sense, Ashwin Sanghi has chosen an interesting subject but a difficult one as people will have high expectations by just reading the title of the book. And Ashwin succeeds in his endeavors. The author deftly manages political stories alternating between 340 BC and the present times. It’s like two books bound into one. No doubts on how this book topped the charts within a few week of its launch and still continues to dominate the fiction charts.

The Mauryan history of Alexander the Great, Dhanananda, Chandragupta Maurya, and Chanakya and the power play of deceit, drama, greed, strategy and politics makes a must read for those believing in drawing parallels from history. And even here Ashwin does not leave much to the readers’ imagination by bringing out the parallel in current political times. Not much has changed and people can viciously go to any extent to get the gains.

The ending could have been crisper, especially of the present times. However, still recommended for all to read.

Adi Shakti, Namo Namah; Sarab Shakti, Namo Namah; Prithum Bhagvati, Namo Namah; Kundalini Mata Shakti, Namo Namah; Mata Shakti, Namo Namah.

Rating: 9/10

Book Journey: Asura Tale of the Vanquished

Asura

Genre: Mythology, Historical Fiction
Book Name: Asura Tale of the Vanquished
Author: Anand Neelakantan
Pages: 500
Publication Year: 2012
Publisher: Leadstart Publishing Pvt Ltd

Every coin has two sides and the side I choose is the one I am going to consider being truthful. Similarly, every story or say, even every war, however wrong it may be from the other side’s perspective, the one who has started or ended considers itself righteous enough to go ahead. So, in the end this all boils down to who is able to tell his or her part of the story to the masses and how many are going to buy that part of story in the first place or even second place.

Asura Tale of the Vanquished is a retelling of the famous Indian epic, Ramayana, from Ravana’s point of view and that’s what makes it interesting. Neelakantan fabricates his book so perfectly around Ramayana that you wish to believe, “yes, that’s how Ravana must have felt, this is the extent of pain various Asuras would have gone through and Ravana, he was not all that bad and neither was Rama so righteous”. Mythology is currently considered an in-thing for the Indian authors, but this one just strikes the right chord. Fluent and simple, an enthralling journey which you may want to read again just to confirm if that was how the Ramayana was supposed to be.

So, have I piqued your interest enough? Ok, a teaser for this book – “Who was Sita? Daughter of Ravana?

Score: 10/10

Book Journey: Night Train to Lisbon

Night Train to Lisbon

Genre: Romance, Historical Fiction
Book Name: Night Train to Lisbon
Author: Emily Grayson
Pages: 224
Publication Year: 2010
Publisher: HarperCollins

Night train to Lisbon, a sweet sensuous love story knotted around the World War II loom, remarkably captures the essence of someone falling in love for the first time and ready to do anything for the other’s sake. And then, that’s the place you want to be part of this tale. The world passing by, nevertheless you only have eyes for that one, and you can’t stop having thoughts of that one the rest of the time. Also, like every other romantic story, there is drama, sadness, happiness and the loop goes again. Was that the hint of a betrayal the other persona was accused of? Will there be any happy forever after, at least in the context of this book? Even if not much heard of in real life, you would still want to believe in fairytales after completing this book by Emily Grayson.

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